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Wormhole Masquerade

photo of green bridge.

The Green Steel Bridge
This bridge; which spans the West River east of the West Dummerston townsite, is known locally as the Green Steel Bridge. On the National Registry of Historic Places it is called the Rice Farm Road Bridge because connects Vermont 30 on the south bank of the West River to Rice Farm Road on the north side. It is a unique looking bridge and even before I knew its history or that it was on the National Register, I pulled over to take a picture because of its appearance and setting. (My wife and daughter who were traveling with me were very patient. After all these years they are either used to it or have given up!) It was only after I got home that I learned the bridge’s interesting story.
 
The bridge was built by Berlin Iron Bridge Company in 1892. The bridge has a total span of 198 feet, and is one lane wide at just 14.2 feet. It crosses the river at a height of 24 feet. For those of you interested in such things, the bridge is a Warren or Hilton thru truss bridge, known for rigidity and impact resistance. It must be durable because, as you can see, the bridge is in amazing condition especially when its age is considered.
 
The bridge was built to service the nearby granite quarry and is one of the oldest metal truss bridges in Vermont. The bridge survived the 1927 floods that destroyed over 1200 bridges in Vermont. That accounts for it being one of the oldest bridges in the state since so many bridges had to be rebuilt or replaced following the floods. The replacement bridges we subject to state wide post-diluvian design standardization. The Green Steel Bridge now stands apart from these bridges as a rare and unique reminder of pre-1927 bridge building in Vermont. The Berlin Iron Bridge Company was one of the largest in New England at the time and was known for their innovative design and building techniques.
 
 The bridge was built to service the nearby quarry. It is one of the oldest metal truss bridge in Vermont. The bridge survived the 1927 floods that destroyed over 1200 bridges in Vermont. That accounts for it being one of the oldest bridges in the state since so many bridges had to be rebuilt or replaced following the floods. The replacement bridges we subject to state wide post-diluvian design standardization. The Green Steel Bridge now stands apart from these bridges as a rare and unique reminder of pre-1927 bridge building in Vermont. The Berlin Iron Bridge Company was one of the largest in New England at the time and was known for their innovative design and building techniques. Copyright by WyoJones. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

I suspect that this isn’t a bridge at all, but a wormhole to a different dimension. And if it’s not? It should be.

What do you think? Am I right?

You know I love comments so much that I pick a favorite to receive my monthly AnaBanana gift basket ($25 value).  Recipient is announced the first blog post of the new month.

Perilously yours,

Pauline

P.S. And while you’re thinking about it, you can check out my other fictional scientific theories in Steamrolled. You can try the first part for FREE.

four covers of steamrolled parts